Take a look at top-airing political ads in Ohio, and you might think there is no presidential race. Instead, outside groups are spending to air ads on Congress, such as as the following.

  1. Club for Growth Action, a conservative super PAC, is running this ad in Cincinnati that talks up Warren Davidson, who is running for the House in Ohio’s eighth district — now held by retiring House Speaker John Boehner. The ad has aired more than 375 times, mostly on news shows but also on “Jeopardy!” “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” and “Judge Judy.” The Dayton Daily News reports that outside groups have spent more than $2 million on advertising in this highly competitive GOP primary race.

2. The American Chemistry Council (ACC), a trade association, is running this ad in praise of Ohio Sen. Rob Portman. It is part of a “seven-figure ad campaign,” writes the ACC, which is also running ads in support of Sen. Roy Blunt, R., Mo., and Pat Toomey, R., Pa. Portman is up for reelection this year. The ad has run more than 365 times in Cleveland and Cincinnatti.

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3. New Leadership for Ohio, a super PAC, is running this ad supporting PG Sittenfeld, a Democrat hoping to take Sen. Portman’s seat. The ad has run more than 200 times in the Cleveland market. Sittenfeld’s Democratic competition is Ted Strickland, former governor and member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Beyond these congressional ads, however, the presidential candidates are also making their pitches on the airwaves. In particular, the campaigns for Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton are running ads as each seeks to be the next winner in a rust belt state. Clinton’s campaign has aired ads more than 465 times in Ohio and counting; the two most seen ads are this one, which has aired widely in other primary states, and this one, which is also getting air play in Florida and North Carolina, which are also holding primaries on March 15. This ad focuses on the high price of prescription drugs.

The Bernie Sanders campaign, meanwhile, is focusing ad airings on this ad on income inequality, which was also used in other primary states. This one, however, which focuses on Sanders’s stance against free trade agreements, has been focused in Ohio.